Patients as whistle blowers – the CQC and rooting out bad practice in restraint of psychiatric patients

30 May

Whistleblower

(Just a very quick tweet-dump to get these thoughts out there and hopefully start them percolating through into a full blog post.)

It seems that the Care Quality Commission (the CQC) is relying on individual psychiatric patients to make complaints in order to trigger improvements in service standards and uncover bad practice. Seems to me that’s akin to expecting us to act as whistle blowers – and we know how hard that is for NHS staff who are in good health. It’s too much of a risk if you’re receiving continuing treatment from the organisation you’d be making a complaint about; & it’s too difficult a task when you’re vulnerable. It’s important that other means are found to weed out bad practice & abuse.

In these conversations with Prof L Appleby, Mental Health Cop, the CQC and others, I suggest a way the CQC can make things better in the restraint, forced treatment & injury of psychiatric patients.

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web links 5My Storify stories

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3 Responses to “Patients as whistle blowers – the CQC and rooting out bad practice in restraint of psychiatric patients”

  1. Michael Cole 1 June 2013 at 6:07 am #

    Keep up the good work. http://www.westmeadhospitalwhistleblowers.com/anonymous-whistleblowing.html Dr Michael Cole

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. Restraint | Sectioned - 19 June 2013

    […] Another post on the use of restraint – Patients as whistle blowers – the CQC and rooting out bad practice in restraint of psychiatric pa… […]

  2. Hospital inspections and dashed hopes | Sectioned - 14 March 2014

    […] Patients as whistle blowers – the CQC and rooting out bad practice in restraint of psychiatric pa… (May 2013) “It seems that the Care Quality Commission (the CQC) is relying on individual psychiatric patients to make complaints in order to trigger improvements in service standards and uncover bad practice. Seems to me that’s akin to expecting us to act as whistle blowers – and we know how hard that is for NHS staff who are in good health. It’s too much of a risk if you’re receiving continuing treatment from the organisation you’d be making a complaint about; and it’s too difficult a task when you’re vulnerable. It’s important that other means are found to weed out bad practice & abuse.” […]

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